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Monday, 02 June 2014 00:00

British Longhair-Introduction

British Longhair

Accepted for Championship in TICA in May 2009

2016 - 2017
Best of Breed

(Click to enlarge)
Best British Longhair of the Year
Best British Longhair of the Year
QGC Flodocats Lana Del Ray
Blue Tortie/White
Best British Longhair Kitten of the Year
Best British Longhair Kitten of the Year
Tiana Bonicat of Kimcatz
Blue Tortie/White
Best British Longhair Alter of the Year
Best British Longhair Alter of the Year
LA SGCA Castlkatz Boodles of Timilew
Cream/White

General Description

The chubby-faced British Shorthair with its chipmunk cheeks and happy smile is famous as the Cheshire Cat in Lewis Carroll's Alice in Wonderland. This sturdy teddy bear has a smile and a plush coat combined with a wonderful disposition that makes them great family pets. It traces its ancestry back to the cats of Rome and is one of the oldest breeds of English cats. Once a hunter and protector of the barns, the British Shorthair now embraces family life, preferring to snooze in comfort by the fire and to exchange hunting for playing with toy mice. It is a dignified, affectionate cat, sometimes referred to as the Winston Churchill of the cat world, roaming its household dominion with all four feet on the floor. The British Longhair takes the recipe for the British Shorthair and adds a longer coat resulting in an imposing longhaired cat with all the same characteristics that have made the British Shorthair such a loyal companion.

History

The British Shorthair origins begin with cats imported from Egypt that accompanied the Romans when they invaded Great Britain. One of the first breeds of the cat fancy, they have changed little over the centuries. As the breed developed, crosses were made with the Persian between 1914 and 1918 introducing the longhair gene. Cats with short coats were part of the British Shorthair and cats with longhair went into the Persian breeding programs. Early on, the blue shorthair consisted of two distinct types: the sturdy, compact British with its round head and the long, elegant Russian with its triangular head. The two types competed together and were interbred before finally separating into unique breeds.

After WW1, the Governing Council of the Cat Fancy (GCCF) declared that only 3rd generation offspring of Persian/British Shorthair crosses could be shown. This reduced the breeding stock and the advent of WW II also affected the breed. After WW II, the British Shorthair lines were all but lost so breeders crossed with domestic shorthairs, Russian Blues, and Persians among others. The British Shorthair has grown in popularity since then and gained championship status in TICA in June 1979. While longhair kittens sometimes appeared in litters, it languished in obscurity as a breed. Today, the imposing British Longhair is a fitting companion breed to the British Shorthair resembling the Persians and Angoras of the early 1900s, obtaining championship status in TICA effective May 2009.

Personality

These genial British cats are friendly and affectionate, enjoying attention in an undemanding manner. The happy-go-lucky males command respect but welcome attention from everyone while the more serious females are true British ladies expecting proper form and etiquette from those whose attentions they accept. These loyal and devoted companions are not lap cats but want to be where you are, snuggling up beside you on the sofa. While not very active cats, they do have their mad moments to chase around acting the clown like kittens. These intelligent cats are quiet and unobtrusive ruling their indoor kingdoms with a calm demeanor. They definitely look before they leap and do not engage in high-flying acrobatics. They are tolerant with children and dogs but do not like to be carried around, preferring to maintain their dignity with their feet firmly on the floor. They are quite content with their own company, quietly amusing themselves in your absence and waiting patiently for your return.

Traits

The British Shorthair has a short, extremely dense plush coat with a crisp feel to it making you want to bury your hands in its luxurious pile. The British Longhair adds length to the dense coat so it stands out from the body emphasizing the cat's imposing lines. In most colors, large, round eyes ranging from deep gold through copper are set into the smiling face. In pointed cats the eyes are blue while deep green eyes shine in the silvers. The classic Blue remains the most popular color however the breed comes in a rainbow of colors.

The British are medium to large, compact, powerfully built cats with a broad, full chest, short strong legs and a short, thick tail tapering slightly to a rounded tip. The British Shorthair has a massiveness that the plush coat emphasizes while the British Longhair cuts an imposing figure as the full coat swirls around the rounded, muscular body. Their round heads have short noses, chubby cheeks and prominent, rounded whisker pads creating an enigmatic smiling look to the face. The round eyes are wide open and, combined with the smile, give the cat an amused air as it watches over its dominion-the look that Lewis Carroll captured so well in the Cheshire Cat!

Maintaining the British Shorthair coat in top condition is easy as the coat does not tangle. A quick comb through easily removes any loose dead hair. A little extra combing in the spring and fall ensures seasonal coat changes do not leave any dead hair to turn into mats. The British Longhair coat takes more work but a daily combing prevents any tangles. It is a good idea to bathe your British Longhair regularly to keep the coat in peak condition. If you plan to bathe your cat, start when the kitten is young and maintain a regular routine so the cat learns to enjoy this extra special time with you.

These cats love food and with their sedentary ways can quickly gain weight so it is important to keep a careful eye on their portions to make sure they do not get fat. They are a heavy, solid cat ranging from 9 to 18 pounds but that weight should come from their massive muscular bodies, not from an excess of food. Encouraging them to play burns calories off while toning muscles: Teaser toys provide lots of gymnastic entertainment; training your cat to fetch adds running to their day; and chasing a laser light pen gives their muscles a real work out.

Monday, 02 June 2014 00:00

British Shorthair Introduction

BRITISH SHORTHAIR

Accepted for Championship in TICA in June 1979

2016 - 2017
Best of Breed

(Click to enlarge)
Best British Shortahair of the Year
Best British Shortahair of the Year
IW SGC Mountteine Rysei
Chocolate
Best British Shortahair Kitten of the Year
Best British Shortahair Kitten of the Year
IW Kolinga Churchill of Fencroft
Blue
Best British Shortahair Alter of the Year
Best British Shortahair Alter of the Year
IW SGC Tartatin of Phoenix/ID
Blue

General Description

The chubby-faced British Shorthair with its chipmunk cheeks and happy smile is famous as the Cheshire Cat in Lewis Carroll's Alice in Wonderland. This sturdy teddy bear has a smile and a plush coat combined with a wonderful disposition that makes them great family pets. It traces its ancestry back to the cats of Rome and is one of the oldest breeds of English cats. Once a hunter and protector of the barns, the British Shorthair now embraces family life, preferring to snooze in comfort by the fire and to exchange hunting for playing with toy mice. It is a dignified, affectionate cat, sometimes referred to as the Winston Churchill of the cat world, roaming its household dominion with all four feet on the floor. The British Longhair takes the recipe for the British Shorthair and adds a longer coat resulting in an imposing longhaired cat with all the same characteristics that have made the British Shorthair such a loyal companion.

History

The British Shorthair origins begin with cats imported from Egypt that accompanied the Romans when they invaded Great Britain. One of the first breeds of the cat fancy, they have changed little over the centuries. As the breed developed, crosses were made with the Persian between 1914 and 1918 introducing the longhair gene. Cats with short coats were part of the British Shorthair and cats with longhair went into the Persian breeding programs. Early on, the blue shorthair consisted of two distinct types: the sturdy, compact British with its round head and the long, elegant Russian with its triangular head. The two types competed together and were interbred before finally separating into unique breeds.

After WW1, the Governing Council of the Cat Fancy (GCCF) declared that only 3rd generation offspring of Persian/British Shorthair crosses could be shown. This reduced the breeding stock and the advent of WW II also affected the breed. After WW II, the British Shorthair lines were all but lost so breeders crossed with domestic shorthairs, Russian Blues, and Persians among others. The British Shorthair has grown in popularity since then and gained championship status in TICA in June 1979. While longhair kittens sometimes appeared in litters, it languished in obscurity as a breed. Today, the imposing British Longhair is a fitting companion breed to the British Shorthair resembling the Persians and Angoras of the early 1900s, obtaining championship status in TICA effective May 2009.

Personality

These genial British cats are friendly and affectionate, enjoying attention in an undemanding manner. The happy-go-lucky males command respect but welcome attention from everyone while the more serious females are true British ladies expecting proper form and etiquette from those whose attentions they accept. These loyal and devoted companions are not lap cats but want to be where you are, snuggling up beside you on the sofa. While not very active cats, they do have their mad moments to chase around acting the clown like kittens. These intelligent cats are quiet and unobtrusive ruling their indoor kingdoms with a calm demeanor. They definitely look before they leap and do not engage in high-flying acrobatics. They are tolerant with children and dogs but do not like to be carried around, preferring to maintain their dignity with their feet firmly on the floor. They are quite content with their own company, quietly amusing themselves in your absence and waiting patiently for your return.

Traits

The British Shorthair has a short, extremely dense plush coat with a crisp feel to it making you want to bury your hands in its luxurious pile. The British Longhair adds length to the dense coat so it stands out from the body emphasizing the cat's imposing lines. In most colors, large, round eyes ranging from deep gold through copper are set into the smiling face. In pointed cats the eyes are blue while deep green eyes shine in the silvers. The classic Blue remains the most popular color however the breed comes in a rainbow of colors.

The British are medium to large, compact, powerfully built cats with a broad, full chest, short strong legs and a short, thick tail tapering slightly to a rounded tip. The British Shorthair has a massiveness that the plush coat emphasizes while the British Longhair cuts an imposing figure as the full coat swirls around the rounded, muscular body. Their round heads have short noses, chubby cheeks and prominent, rounded whisker pads creating an enigmatic smiling look to the face. The round eyes are wide open and, combined with the smile, give the cat an amused air as it watches over its dominion-the look that Lewis Carroll captured so well in the Cheshire Cat!

Maintaining the British Shorthair coat in top condition is easy as the coat does not tangle. A quick comb through easily removes any loose dead hair. A little extra combing in the spring and fall ensures seasonal coat changes do not leave any dead hair to turn into mats. The British Longhair coat takes more work but a daily combing prevents any tangles. It is a good idea to bathe your British Longhair regularly to keep the coat in peak condition. If you plan to bathe your cat, start when the kitten is young and maintain a regular routine so the cat learns to enjoy this extra special time with you.

These cats love food and with their sedentary ways can quickly gain weight so it is important to keep a careful eye on their portions to make sure they do not get fat. They are a heavy, solid cat ranging from 9 to 18 pounds but that weight should come from their massive muscular bodies, not from an excess of food. Encouraging them to play burns calories off while toning muscles: Teaser toys provide lots of gymnastic entertainment; training your cat to fetch adds running to their day; and chasing a laser light pen gives their muscles a real work out.

Sunday, 01 June 2014 06:00

Abyssinian Breeders

ABYSSINIAN

Accepted for Championship in TICA in June 1979

2016 - 2017
Best of Breed

(Click to enlarge)
Best Abyssinian of the Year
Best Abyssinian of the Year
IW SGC Mysticoaws Magical Storm
Ruddy Ticked Tabby
Best Abyssinian Kitten of the Year
Best Abyssinian Kitten of the Year
Blueriver Copy Cat
Ruddy Ticked Tabby
Best Abyssinian Alter of the Year
Best Abyssinian Alter of the Year
IW SGCA Anubis Maserati of Khamsin/CF
Cinnamon Ticked Tabby
Online Breeder Logo

TICA Breeders

The breeders below are all members of TICA's Online Breeders. When you visit their cattery website, look for the TICA Online Breeders logo.

The breeders you find listed here are TICA members who have signed the TICA Code of Ethics. Since we are a large association we do not have the resources to visit each of the listed catteries before linking to their website. Please read our information about Adopting a Cat or Kitten before visiting a breeder.

See your cattery listed here or renew your current listing! Find out how.

Have you registered your cattery name? Check if it is available!

Abyssinian Breeders

Argentina

ACONCAGUA

USA - Georgia

AKSUM

USA - Missouri

PIERREMONT

USA - North Carolina

ALEXY

USA - Washington

HERUS

DISCLAIMER
The International Cat Association, Inc.® (TICA®) Does Not Endorse any of the breeders, products, or services on this page unless otherwise noted. Please read our Disclaimers.
Monday, 02 June 2014 00:00

Birman-Introduction

Birman

Accepted for Championship in TICA in June 1979

2016 - 2017
Best of Breed

(Click to enlarge)
Best Birman of the Year
Best Birman of the Year
IW SGC Bullamoor Beaujangles of Amisti
Seal Lynx (Tabby) Point/Gloved
Best Birman Kitten of the Year
Best Birman Kitten of the Year
IW Bullamoor Beaujangles of Amisti
Seal Lynx (Tabby) Point/Gloved
Best Birman Alter of the Year
Best Birman Alter of the Year
RW SGCA Starghatts Lassiter
Seal Point/Gloved

General Description

The legendary Birman takes your breath away with its stunning pointed, semi-longhaired coat and bewitching deep sapphire blue eyes. The silky coat is light in color and ideally misted with a golden hue. They have white gloves on all four feet and white laces up the back of their hindlegs contrasting with the main point color. These gentle cats have a stocky build and a powerful musculature-keep them in top condition by indulging their love for play!

History

The Birman has a lovely legend about being raised by the Kittah priests in their temple in Burma. The story tells of a golden eyed, white cat that stood guard over his dying holy master and was transformed into a cat with a dark brown head, and dark brown legs & tail, but his coat became a cream color with a golden glow from this master's golden goddess. As the master died and his soul passed on to the cat, the cat's paws and hocks, where he sat on his master's chest, stayed pure white as a sign of his master's purity. As the cat gazed up at the golden goddess, his gold eyes turned to a beautiful sapphire blue, the same as his master's goddess. There are many versions of the legend, and this is just a very short one.

As for fact, the Birman was first recognized and shown in France in the 1920's. England then recognized the breed in 1966. The Birman was first imported into the United States in the 1960's and was recognized and shown in 1967. The Birman breed is now recognized and loved worldwide! This Birman breed has consistently remained in the top ten most favorite cats for many years.

Personality

The Birman is a great family cat. It dwells peacefully within a single cat home or a home with many cat friends. With a constant response from his owner when the cat meows, the Birman will become quite a talker. If you prefer just the quietness of his purr, lack of response will discourage the cat from talking. With lots of love, good food, fond grooming, and proper health care, the Birman makes the greatest buddy, friend, confidant, and all around purrfect pet.

Traits

The Birman is a medium to medium-large longhaired pointed cat with distinctive white gloves and laces. All four feet have white gloves and the back feet have laces extending about halfway up the back leg.

The Birman has a long, soft, almost silky single coat. The thickness will vary with seasonal conditions. This coat is of such that it has a tendency not to mat. With good grooming habits on the part of the owner, stray hairs can be combed out weekly. The combing action can be good together time for cat and owner.

Birmans have a distinctive roman nose that, when viewed in profile, starts at the change of direction at the forehead and rises in a hill-shape that goes down at the end with the nose leather low. The chin has good depth and should not be bulbous or receding. The ears are almost as wide at the base as they are tall. They have good width between them. The eyes are medium to large and moderately round, with good width between. The tail is neither long or short, but in balance with the body. This is checked by gently holding the tail along the back so that it reaches the shoulder blades. The body is long and sturdy. The legs should be well muscled and in good proportion to the body.

Birmans come in all pointed colors. There is a color to match anyone's desire. They are all beautiful.....they are all BIRMAN.

Sunday, 01 June 2014 18:00

Bengal Introduction

BENGAL

Accepted for Championship in TICA in May 1986

2016 - 2017
Best of Breed

(Click to enlarge)
Best Bengal of the Year
Best Bengal of the Year
IW SGC Lagallerie Mocha Fudge Ripple
Seal Sepia Marbled Tabby
Best Bengal Kitten of the Year
Best Bengal Kitten of the Year
IW Moulinrouge Mister T
Brown (Black) Spotted Tabby
Best Bengal Alter of the Year
Best Bengal Alter of the Year
SGCA Laulea Dai
Seal Spotted Lynx (Tabby) Point

General Description

Loved by those who appreciate its inquisitive and loving nature, the Bengal is a medium to large cat renowned for its richly colored, highly contrasted coat of vivid spots or distinctive marbling. Originally developed from crosses between the domestic cats and the Asian Leopard Cat, the Bengal is the only domestic cat that can have rosettes like the markings on Leopards, Jaguars and Ocelots. Today's domestic Bengal cat comes only from breeding Bengals to other Bengals and requires no specialized care. Since their beginnings in 1986, the Bengal's regal beauty and alluring charm have quickly made it one of the most popular breeds. Employing scientific insights and a cooperative spirit, Bengal breeders continue to develop these stunning cats with careful selection for temperament, health and beauty. Bengals participate in TICA shows throughout the world and have a devoted following of happy pet owners who couldn't imagine sharing their lives with anything other than these feline beauties.

History

Throughout history there are indications of a profound human fascination with the large and small wild felines that inhabit the jungles and forest of the world. In 1963, Jean S. Mill crossed the domestic cat with the Asian Leopard Cat, a spotted five to twelve pound shy wild cat species from Asia. This was the first effort to use hybrid offspring to create a breed of domestic cat with the loving nature of a favored fireside tabby and the striking look associated with Leopards, Ocelots and Jaguars. The modern Bengal breed traces to cats bred by Mrs. Mill beginning in the early 1980's. The breed's name is a reference to the scientific name of the Asian Leopard Cat, Prionailurus bengalensis. The hybrid crosses are registered as Foundation (F1, F2 & F3) Bengals that are not eligible for show and only the females are used for breeding.

Accepted as a new breed in TICA in 1986, Bengals gained championship status in 1991. They are now one of the most frequently exhibited breeds in TICA. An enthusiastic group of breeders around the world have successfully fulfilled the goal of creating a docile, civilized house cat that wears the richly patterned coat of the jungle cats and has some of the arresting features that have inspired and aroused humanity for centuries.

Personality

While you can train a Bengal to have "good manners", they are an active, inquisitive cat that loves to be up high. If you don't like a cat to leave the floor, a Bengal is probably not the right cat for you. Bengals are busy by nature. They are very affectionate and can be a "lap cat" whenever THEY want to be, but in general their idea of fun is playing, chasing, climbing and investigating. When a Bengal is in full play mode, it's rather like trying to hold on to running water! They'll often save the cuddle time for when they want to sleep. Many Bengals enjoy water and may join you in brushing your teeth or taking a shower. Some Bengals are vocal while others are more quiet and selective about using their voice.

Bengals will also, in general, ALWAYS want to be where you are. After all, that's where the action is! And Bengals are all about "The Action". When given the choice of a static toy, and one that does wild, unpredictable things, Bengals will always choose the "wild" one! For individuals or families who enjoy rambunctious, funny, beautiful and dynamic feline companionship, consider the Bengal.

Traits

The Bengal is most noted for it luxurious short, soft coat which may appear in either the spotted or marble pattern. Some Bengal's coats feature something called glitter which imparts an iridescent sheen to each hair. The spotted pattern is most associated with the "leopard look" as the coat features clearly discernible spots and rosettes. The Bengal's spots can be large or small and often include rosettes, like the spots of Jaguars and Leopards, which are two- toned spots. Bengals may also be marbled, which is a derivative of the classic or "bull's eye" pattern found in many breeds of cats but with an especially dramatic appearance in Bengals. The marbled Bengal has a swirling pattern that appears as random swirls or thick diagonal and horizontal lines flowing across the coat of the cat.

The most popular color of the Bengal is the brown/black tabby, a lackluster description for coats that can be anywhere from a cool grey to vibrant shades of golden, bronze, copper or mahogany with spots or marbling ranging from rich browns to intense black. Bengals also come in a range of colors associated with a form of albinism, called "snow" by breeders, that indicates Siamese and Burmese ancestry. In these colors the coat appears ivory, cream or light tan with spots or marbling that may range from light brown to dark chocolate and the eye color is blue to aqua. Silver Bengals have grey to nearly white backgrounds with dark grey to black patterns. Also distinctive about the Bengal's coloring is that they may have nearly white undersides and facial markings that still show the tabby pattern.

Bengals are medium to large cats, from 6-15 pounds, with males generally being larger than females. A healthy Bengal is well muscled and has an appearance that depicts its athleticism. Bengals are balanced cats and none of its physical features should appear exaggerated or especially pronounced.

Bengals are generally confident, curious and devoted companions. They get along well with other pets when properly introduced and enjoy being part of a family. Each Bengal is an individual and those interested should find out as much as they can about this wonderful breed before adding one to their family.

Monday, 02 June 2014 00:00

Balinese-Introduction

Balinese

Accepted for Championship in TICA in June 1979

2016 - 2017
Best of Breed

(Click to enlarge)
Best Balinese of the Year
Best Balinese of the Year
SGC Souslesaule Dentelle of KLM
Chocolate Point
Best Balinese Kitten of the Year
Best Balinese Kitten of the Year
Balimoor Sunset Bell
Cinnamon Lynx (Tabby) Point
Best Balinese Alter of the Year
Best Balinese Alter of the Year
RW SGCA Balihoo Bluebeary
Blue Lynx (Tabby) Point

General Description

In a nutshell, the graceful, majestic Balinese is a Siamese with a long coat. But they are so much more than this! The long coat of this affectionate cat flows over the long body without obscuring any of its elegant lines as it seeks its next adventure with eyes glinting with mischief. The fine-boned, slim Balinese has the grace of the dancers of Bali and its muscular body is covered with a long, silky ermine coat. Its sapphire blue eyes sparkle with intelligence and curiosity as it surveys its kingdom but at a moment's notice the Balinese discards its regal bearing to engage in a game clowning around with a toy mouse. Its princely bearing and fluid grace constantly remind one that its ancestors were considered sacred in Siam surrounding it with an air of royalty.

History

The early history of the Balinese is unknown although sporadic references to it occur from early on. Some say there is a Chinese tapestry depicting a longhair, an 1871 Penny Illustrated magazine contains a reference to a longhaired Siamese, and we find a CFF registration record for one in 1928. While the longhaired kittens were showing up sporadically, the history of the Balinese starts with the first breeding programs in the 1950s. Two Siamese breeders, Marion Dorsey (Rai-Mar) in California and Helen Smith (MerryMews) in New York, both fell in love with the beauty of some longhair kittens that appeared in their Siamese litters and decided to develop more of the lovely cats. Helen Smith coined the name Balinese to reflect their grace and elegance that reminded her of Balinese dancers.

The Balinese was originally recognized in four colors: seal, blue, chocolate and lilac. In 1979, red and cream along with the tabby pattern were also accepted rounding out the color palette to include red, cream, tortoiseshells of all color combinations as both solid color points and tabby points. More recently, these colors in combination with white were accepted widening the color spectrum to include bicolor points. TICA recognized the Balinese for competition in 1979.

Personality

Balinese have extremely loving temperaments and bond closely with their families. They will be your best friend and want to be involved in everything you do from helping you make the bed to working on the computer (surely you really meant to send those cryptic messages of love your Balinese typed in for you?) to joining in all kinds of games. These gregarious cats will chat with you about any and all subjects while calling your attention to something you may have missed. They demand lots of attention and get into mischief so should not be left alone for long periods. They love to play and can make a toy out of anything-that little toy mouse, a leaf that blew indoors, a piece of paper, a teaser toy-that will amuse them for hours. Balinese get along well with children and other pets, fitting easily into the family.

Traits

The Balinese has a single coat that lies close to the long, slim body. The lack of undercoat reduces the likelihood of matting. The soft coat is fine and silky and is half an inch to two inches long over the body. There is no ruff at the neck but the tail carries a magnificent plume where the hair can be up to 5 inches long. They have the same stunning deep sapphire blue eyes as the Siamese. The Balinese also has the pointed pattern where color is restricted to the mask or face, ears, legs and tail with a contrasting creamy white body. It comes in a wide variety of pointed colors and patterns from the commonly known seal point to the rare lilac tabby & white point.

Balinese are sleek, dainty cats with long tubular bodies and fine boning. In fact, the Balinese is the epitome of long-long svelte body, long tail fringed with long hair, long fine-boned legs, and a long straight profile. From the tip of its nose to the tip of its tail and down to the tip of its toes the dancing Balinese is long and graceful. The head is a long tapering triangle that flares out from the nose to the tips of the ears. While dainty and elegant, it is all muscle giving it the feel of silk-covered steel. It is a medium-sized cat with males weighing from 6-8 pounds and females ranging from 5-7 pounds.

The Balinese is a vocal cat that enjoys conversing with you. Its voice is a bit quieter and softer than that of the Siamese and it is not quite as insistent as the Siamese. If you are looking for an interactive vocal cat, the graceful Balinese may well be just what you are searching for.

The silky single coat makes the Balinese an easy longhaired cat to keep in perfect condition. It rarely tangles or mats and a quick combing easily removes any loose dead hair while keep the spectacular plumed tail at its very best. Other than that, all that is needed is a quick wipe of the ears with a cotton swab to remove any wax and a quick nail trim to keep your cat perfectly manicured.

Friday, 30 May 2014 18:00

American Wirehair-Introduction

American Wirehair

Accepted for Championship in TICA in June 1979

2016 - 2017
Best of Breed

(Click to enlarge)
Best American Wirehair of the Year
Best American Wirehair of the Year
SGC Beauchador Love On The Brain
White
Best American Wirehair Kitten of the Year
Best American Wirehair Kitten of the Year
Beauchador Hedley
Black Silver Classic Tabby
Best American Wirehair Alter of the Year
Best American Wirehair Alter of the Year
Vibrations Turron
Red Silver Classic Tabby/White

General Description

Like its counterpart, the American Shorthair, the American Wirehair is one of the most adaptable breeds for any type of household-from being the lap cat curled up with the senior citizen to the energetic cat joining in to play with the children. One of the natural breeds, the American Wirehair is a medium size cat, muscular with a firm, well-balanced body. The wirehair gene originated as a spontaneous coat mutation in upstate New York and changes the hard coat of the American Shorthair to the hard, dense, springy coat of the American Wirehair.

History

The first American Wirehair was found in a litter of 6 kittens born on Council Rock Farm in Verona, New York. The kitten was a red-and-white male with a sparse, wiry coat-every hair, including his whiskers, was crimped and springy. His parents, Bootsie and Fluffy, were normal-coated domestic shorthairs who lived on the farm owned by Nathan Mosher. Local cat breeder Joan O'Shea saw the kitten and, recognizing him as unique, was able to acquire him. She named him Council Rock Farm Adam of Hi-Fi. He was bred to a female belonging to O'Shea's neighbor and produced kittens with a wiry coat. The female had also come from Mosher's farm so could have carried the wirehair gene. A second breeding to an unrelated female also produced wire-haired kittens thereby establishing it as a dominant gene.

O'Shea sent hair samples for analysis to noted British cat geneticists A.G. Searle and Roy Robinson. Robinson replied to her that the samples of Adam's hair showed the coat was unique and not related to the Cornish or Devon Rexes. All three hair types (down, awn and guard) were twisted and the awn hairs were also hooked at the tip. The cat was closest in type to the American Shorthair and this was the breed used to develop the American Wirehair. Today the only difference between the two breeds is the coat.

Personality

American Wirehairs are good-natured, easy-going cats, popular with families, as they are known to be very tolerant of children. They are calm but can also be playful even into old age. Female cats tend to be busier than the males; males are more easygoing. In general, they are intelligent cats and quite interested in everything around them. Many American Wirehairs retain their hunting instincts with any insects that should venture into the house. They also like to watch birds and other activity from a windowsill. They enjoy the company of their people but retain their independence. Many are lap cats, while some prefer just to be nearby.

Traits

The American Wirehair is a medium sized cat with no exaggerated features. It is not a large, heavy boned cat as is the British. It is a very balanced medium size, medium boned cat, with a firm muscular feel to the body, well proportioned in all parts. The head is slightly longer than wide and with an open, sweet expression. Eyes are wide-set, medium to large in size proportionate with the size of head, rounded, which means the upper lid is shaped like half an almond and the lower lid is a fully rounded curve. The muzzle is medium-short with a full strong chin giving it a squarish appearance like a matchbox; ears are medium in size and slightly rounded at the tip set twice the distance between eyes. There are a number of different looks found in the Americans that are acceptable by the standard. Females are smaller than males with the balance of the cat being of most importance. Americans do not mature until they are around three or four years old. The features of the breed are then at their best.

The wiry coat like steel wool defines the American Wirehair as distinct from all other cat breeds. It comes in all colors and patterns but the wiriness itself has several degrees varying from spiked to curly with the individual hairs being crimped, hooked or bent. The ideal coat, including the whiskers, is dense, coarse and crimped over the whole body. Some coats are completely wired but very hard and sparse making them break easily. The coat is relatively soft to the touch but springs back into place when stroked.

Some American Wirehairs have sensitive skin that can be susceptible to outside influences resulting in an allergic reaction. To reduce any potential problems, the skin and coat should be kept clean with regular bathing to remove loose dead hooked hairs that could initiate some irritation. The coat can be a little greasy from the oil secreted by the skin and regular bathing removes this grease too. Gently clean earwax out with a cotton swab when bathing the cat.

Friday, 30 May 2014 18:00

American Shorthair-Introduction

American Shorthair

Accepted for Championship in TICA in June 1979

2016 - 2017
Best of Breed

(Click to enlarge)
Best American Shorthair of the Year
Best American Shorthair of the Year
IW SGC Mowgleaves Stonehenge
Black Silver Classic Tabby/White
Best American Shorthair Kitten of the Year
Best American Shorthair Kitten of the Year
IW SGC Mowgleaves Stonehenge
Black Silver Classic Tabby/White
Best American Shorthair Alter of the Year
Best American Shorthair Alter of the Year
LA SGCA Kelloggs Hit The Lights of Samphire
Black Silver Classic Tabby

General Description

The American Shorthair, our native shorthair breed, is one of the most adaptable breeds for any type of household; for a single person living alone, the American is an excellent companion for a senior citizen; the American is a calm, devoted pet; for a family with children, the good natured, playful American, known to be excellent with children, fits right in; for a busy household, the non-demanding American keeps itself entertained, ready for the time they have for relaxation. Apartment living suits them as well as a house. One of the natural breeds, the American Shorthair is a medium size cat, muscular with a firm, well-balanced body. They have easy care short, lustrous coat in a range of colors and patterns.

History

Although not listed on ships rosters, the American Shorthair came with early settlers to this country bringing their diverse backgrounds to form an "American" cat. They were "working cats" protecting the ships' stores on the long journeys. These early American cats were strong, hardy cats that earned their living status here with their hunting skills but were soon noticed for their intelligence and many varied colors and patterns.

In early cat exhibitions in the 1900, the shorthair cats then known as Domestic Shorthairs were represented. As more shorthair breeds were imported, dedicated breeders of the domestics began selective breeding to develop a cat of specific type. Although the American Shorthair is a natural breed, it is the process of selective breeding that has developed the American as we know it today. It was not until the early 1960s that the breed was renamed American Shorthair and began its rise in recognition and as a contender on the show circuit.

Personality

Americans are good-natured, easy-going cats, popular with families, as they are known to be very tolerant of children. They can be calm but are also playful even into old age. Female cats tend to be busier than the males; males are more easygoing. In general they are intelligent cats and quite interested in everything around them. Many Americans retain their hunting instincts with any insects that should venture into the house. They also like to watch birds and other activity from a windowsill. They enjoy the company of their people but retain their independence. Many are lap cats, while some prefer just to be nearby.

Traits

The standard relies heavily on the term medium. It is not a large, heavy boned cat as is the British. It is a very balanced medium size, medium boned cat, with a firm muscular feel to the body, well proportioned in all parts. The head is slightly longer than wide and with an open, sweet expression. Eyes are wide-set, medium to large in size proportionate with the size of head, rounded, which means the upper lid is shaped like half an almond and the lower lid is a fully rounded curve--the eyes should not be round as are the Exotic Shorthairs. The muzzle is medium-short with a full strong chin giving it a squarish appearance; ears are medium in size and slightly rounded at the tip set twice the distance between eyes. There are a number of different looks found in the Americans that are acceptable by the standard. Females are smaller than males with the balance of the cat being of most importance.

The coast is short, hard in texture, lustrous, dense enough to give a natural protective appearance. The color of the cat seems to affect the texture to some degree with the ideal coat most often found in the brown tabbies. Color and pattern are weighed equally with clarity of the marking in the patterns most desirable. Tabby and Tabby with white, usually with the classic pattern, have been the most popular for showing. The coat requires little extra care so unless being shown, a bath is rarely necessary; a weekly combing to remove dead hair will suffice. When bathed for a show care must be taken or the coat ends up too soft or fluffy.

Americans do not really mature until they are around three or four years old. The features of the breed are then at their best.

Friday, 30 May 2014 18:00

American curl Longhair-Introduction

American curl Longhair

Accepted for Championship in TICA in May 1988

2016 - 2017
Best of Breed

(Click to enlarge)
Best American Curl Longhair of the Year
Best American Curl Longhair of the Year
IW SGC Curland Gucci/ID
Lilac Silver Lynx (Tabby) Point/White
Best American Curl Longhair Kitten of the Year
Best American Curl Longhair Kitten of the Year
Overear Dropsofjupiter
Red Silver Shaded/White
Best American Curl Longhair Alter of the Year
Best American Curl Longhair Alter of the Year
IW SGCA Pontcurl Alexey Leonov
Black Silver Spotted Tabby

General Description

One of America's native breeds, the American Curl is a medium-sized cat with unique ears that curl out and back in a graceful arc giving a unique alert appearance to the cat. The swept-back ears give the cat a happy, perky expression that quickly brings a smile to the face of everyone who sees them. The sophisticated head combined with the graceful body provide the American Curl with a stylish, dynamic presence.

History

The American Curl story begins on a hot sunny day in June 1981 in Lakewood, California when Joe and Grace Ruga found a stray black kitten with a long-haired silky coat and unusual ears on their doorstep. The affectionate kitten quickly endeared herself to the Ruga's and was named Shulamith and all American Curls trace back to her. In December 1981, Shulamith had her first litter of kittens and two of the four kittens had the same curly ears as their mother beginning a worldwide discussion on the genetics of the unusual ears. 1983 saw cat fanciers developing selective breeding programs to conserve the gene and to develop a breed based on it. At the same time, the unique cats were presented to the cat fancy to showcase this rare new addition to the feline world.

Roy Robinson, the renowned English feline geneticist, worked with the breeders and analyzed the data on 383 kittens from 81 litters. He confirmed that ear-curling gene was unique and that it was an autosomal dominant gene - that means any cat with even one copy of the gene will show the trait. In an article published in the December 1989 issue of the Journal of Heredity, he reported that he had found no defects in any of the crosses that he had analyzed and this laid the foundation for a new and healthy breed.

Personality

Curls are curious, exuberant and loving companions that greet each day with joy as they look for new challenges and adventures. They are exceedingly people-oriented and pat you to get your attention as they want to include you in all their activities. They want to be with you all the time whether sleeping in your bed at night or curled on your lap to watch their favorite TV show. They adore children and adapt well to other pets and new situations. When introduced to their new homes, they are alert and inquisitive but respect the earlier occupants. These even-tempered intelligent companions are devoted to their owners and follow them around so as to be sure they are part of everything! Expect their help with all your projects. They have quiet voices and are not overly talkative however they make their wants known with gentle trilling and cooing sounds. Their kitten-like personalities have earned them the nickname of the Peter Pan of cats.

Traits

American Curls come in longhair and shorthair-and a myriad of colors. The coat is a silky, flat-lying coat with little undercoat. Consequently, there is little shedding and the coat requires little grooming. While the curled ears are the major feature of this special breed, other key characteristics of the American Curl are its large walnut shaped eyes and a medium-sized rectangular body.

All American Curls are born with straight ears. They start to curl back into a rosebud position at 3-5 days gently unfolding like a rose petal until they reach their final shape at about 16 weeks. The degree of curl in the ear can vary greatly ranging from almost straight to an arc of 90-180 degrees. To ensure the health and genetic diversity of the breed, breeders do outcross breedings to cats without curled ears. At least 50% of the kittens from these breedings will have curled ears. 100% of the kittens in a Curl to Curl breeding will have curled ears. The straight-eared cats still have all the personality of their curled ear brethren and make equally delightful pets. The gene to curl the ear affects the cartilage of the ear which remains firm to the touch - it should never be stiff or floppy. However, care should be taken with the ears so as not to break the cartilage and the ears should never be forced into unnatural positions.

American Curls are well-balanced, medium sized cats with a rounded head, a substantial muzzle and distinct whisker pads. They have an elegant, alert appearance with a sweet, open expression and their remarkable ears. While both have soft silky coats, the longhaired American Curl also has a beautifully plumed tail.

Friday, 30 May 2014 18:00

American curl-Introduction

American curl

Accepted for Championship in TICA in May 1988

2016 - 2017
Best of Breed

(Click to enlarge)
Best American Curl of the Year
Best American Curl of the Year
SGC Americurlzz Catchew O Liberty
Black Silver Classic Torbie/White
Best American Curl Kitten of the Year
Best American Curl Kitten of the Year
Americurlzz Catchew O Liberty
Black Silver Classic Torbie/White
Best American Curl Alter of the Year
Best American Curl Alter of the Year
Shiningcurl Volgograd
Brown (Black) Classic Tabby/White

General Description

One of America's native breeds, the American Curl is a medium-sized cat with unique ears that curl out and back in a graceful arc giving a unique alert appearance to the cat. The swept-back ears give the cat a happy, perky expression that quickly brings a smile to the face of everyone who sees them. The sophisticated head combined with the graceful body provide the American Curl with a stylish, dynamic presence.

History

The American Curl story begins on a hot sunny day in June 1981 in Lakewood, California when Joe and Grace Ruga found a stray black kitten with a long-haired silky coat and unusual ears on their doorstep. The affectionate kitten quickly endeared herself to the Ruga's and was named Shulamith and all American Curls trace back to her. In December 1981, Shulamith had her first litter of kittens and two of the four kittens had the same curly ears as their mother beginning a worldwide discussion on the genetics of the unusual ears. 1983 saw cat fanciers developing selective breeding programs to conserve the gene and to develop a breed based on it. At the same time, the unique cats were presented to the cat fancy to showcase this rare new addition to the feline world.

Roy Robinson, the renowned English feline geneticist, worked with the breeders and analyzed the data on 383 kittens from 81 litters. He confirmed that ear-curling gene was unique and that it was an autosomal dominant gene - that means any cat with even one copy of the gene will show the trait. In an article published in the December 1989 issue of the Journal of Heredity, he reported that he had found no defects in any of the crosses that he had analyzed and this laid the foundation for a new and healthy breed.

Personality

Curls are curious, exuberant and loving companions that greet each day with joy as they look for new challenges and adventures. They are exceedingly people-oriented and pat you to get your attention as they want to include you in all their activities. They want to be with you all the time whether sleeping in your bed at night or curled on your lap to watch their favorite TV show. They adore children and adapt well to other pets and new situations. When introduced to their new homes, they are alert and inquisitive but respect the earlier occupants. These even-tempered intelligent companions are devoted to their owners and follow them around so as to be sure they are part of everything! Expect their help with all your projects. They have quiet voices and are not overly talkative however they make their wants known with gentle trilling and cooing sounds. Their kitten-like personalities have earned them the nickname of the Peter Pan of cats.

Traits

American Curls come in longhair and shorthair-and a myriad of colors. The coat is a silky, flat-lying coat with little undercoat. Consequently, there is little shedding and the coat requires little grooming. While the curled ears are the major feature of this special breed, other key characteristics of the American Curl are its large walnut shaped eyes and a medium-sized rectangular body.

All American Curls are born with straight ears. They start to curl back into a rosebud position at 3-5 days gently unfolding like a rose petal until they reach their final shape at about 16 weeks. The degree of curl in the ear can vary greatly ranging from almost straight to an arc of 90-180 degrees. To ensure the health and genetic diversity of the breed, breeders do outcross breedings to cats without curled ears. At least 50% of the kittens from these breedings will have curled ears. 100% of the kittens in a Curl to Curl breeding will have curled ears. The straight-eared cats still have all the personality of their curled ear brethren and make equally delightful pets. The gene to curl the ear affects the cartilage of the ear which remains firm to the touch - it should never be stiff or floppy. However, care should be taken with the ears so as not to break the cartilage and the ears should never be forced into unnatural positions.

American Curls are well-balanced, medium sized cats with a rounded head, a substantial muzzle and distinct whisker pads. They have an elegant, alert appearance with a sweet, open expression and their remarkable ears. While both have soft silky coats, the longhaired American Curl also has a beautifully plumed tail.